© 2020 by SICC Canada,

Sherzad Immigration & Citizenship Consultancy nc.

SICC Canada

Sherzad immigration & Citizenship Consultancy Inc.

32 Westwinds Crescent NE Unit 130 

Calgary, AB T3J 5L3

sherzad.immigration@gmail.com

Tel: 403-690-9973

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Ehsan Ali Sherzad

Regulated Citizenship and Immigration Consultant

                                                      R524370

Citizenship

Many Canadian permanent residents who have weathered the immigration processlook forward to being granted citizenship, and are eager for the day they can be sworn in as an official Canadian citizen. Before that day comes, there are a few final steps that need to be addressed before Immigration, Refugees, Citizenship Canada (IRCC) approves their Canadian citizenship application.

 

Requirements for Canadian Citizenship

As with all Canadian immigration programs, permanent residents must meet a specific set of requirements to be deemed eligible to apply for citizenship. Among other requirements, applicants will also need to provide proof that they have been living in Canada for three years (1,095 days) out of the five years that precede their signed application.

 

Applying for Citizenship

Following amendments to the Citizen Act which came into effect in late 2017, Canadian permanent residents can now expect a faster, easier citizenship application process. Eligible applicants will be required to pass the Canadian citizenship test, and may be asked to undergo an interview before a citizenship judge, if requested by IRCC. Once approved, applicants will attend a Citizenship Ceremony to take the Oath of Citizenship, where they will officially become a Canadian citizen.

 

Dual Citizenship

As Canada recognizes dual citizenship, you will not be required to relinquish your natural citizenship once your application has been approved by IRCC. 

 

Rights and Responsibilities

Once a permanent resident has been granted Canadian citizenship, they are entitled to the same rights and responsibilities of a natural Canadian citizen. Though permanent residents share many of the same rights as that of a citizen, the most notable differences would be the right to vote in federal, provincial, and municipal Canadian elections, and the elimination of residency obligations.